Day 20: Neil hollows

On Saturday morning, June 22 2013, the ubiquitous camera catches Neil Turner hollowing a deep vase cut from the ash log he began turning yesterday.

The ash wood, from the city log dump, has beautiful figure and color. Neil has turned the outside and begun to hollow the inside.

The ash wood, from the city log dump, has beautiful figure and color. Neil has turned the outside and begun to hollow the inside.

Neil's deep hollowing tool uses a plastic cable tie as a thickness gauge. The gap between the end of the tie and the tool bit indicates the wall thickness.

Neil’s deep hollowing tool uses a plastic cable tie as a thickness gauge. It’s anchored on an auxiliary arm Neil can move along the tool’s shank. 

The gap between the plastic cable tie and the tool tip indicates the vessel's wall thickness.

The gap between the plastic cable tie and the tool tip indicates the vessel’s wall thickness.

Deep hollowing happens far off the tool rest, so it takes a lot of effort. Neil tucks the tool handle into his body and leans into the work.

Deep hollowing happens far off the tool rest, so it takes a lot of effort. Neil tucks the tool handle into his body and leans into the work.

A blast of compressed air is the quickest way to clear the chips from inside a deep vessel.

A blast of compressed air is the quickest way to clear the chips from inside a deep vessel.

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