Day 41: Open Studio

Saturday July 13 2013. About 50 people show up for our Open Studio day, we get to show what we’ve been up to these recent weeks, and it’s great to get interested and positive feedback. Everyone is energized by the event. I have to confess, I got caught up in it myself and didn’t shoot as many photos as usual. Here’s what I did shoot:

Neil Turner discusses his  embellished turnings with Heather Lineberry, the visiting scholar. Heather is here for only a week. A museum professional, she knows to cradle turnings in the hand, not lift them by the rim.

Neil Turner discusses his embellished turnings with Heather Lineberry, the visiting scholar. Heather is here for only a week. A museum professional, she knows to cradle turnings in the hand, not lift them by the rim.

The early arrivals enjoy a slide show of our portfolios and blog photos.

The early arrivals enjoy a slide show of our portfolios and blog photos.

Neil's carved turnings impress members of the Lancaster Area Woodturners club.

Ben Carpenter shows a table full of his and Neil’s work to members of the Lancaster Area Woodturners club. Ron Sheehan, center, l00ks mightily impressed by Neil’s work. 

Malcolm whales away at a cherry plank and makes the big chips fly, giving the crowd a taste of real woodcarving.

Malcolm whales away at a cherry plank and makes the big chips fly, giving the crowd a taste of real woodcarving.

Malcolm Martin and Gaynor Dowling show their carved vessels to Tina LeCoff.

Malcolm Martin and Gaynor Dowling show their carved vessels to Tina LeCoff.

Harrison Zwelling, with his mom Jennifer, enjoyed cranking the UArts bench vises. Jennifer is a past ITE scholar.

Young Harrison, with his mom Jennifer Zwilling, enjoyed cranking the UArts bench vises. Jennifer was the 2011 ITE scholar.

Doug Reesor, from the Lancaster Area Woodturners club, studies Neil's steam-bending experiment.

Doug Reesor, from the Lancaster Area Woodturners club, studies Neil’s steam-bending experiment.

Don Miller, head of the woodshop at UArts, studies  a carved vessel made by Malcolm and Gaynor.

Don Miller, head of the woodshop at UArts, studies a carved vessel made by Malcolm and Gaynor.

Jack Larimore, a leading Philadelphia-area furniture maker, is a past ITE resident and a strong supporter of the program. Jack's sitting in front of the limniscatre of Bernoulli drawn by one of John Kelsey's gizmos.

Jack Larimore, a leading Philadelphia-area furniture maker, is a past ITE resident and a strong supporter of the program. Jack’s sitting in front of the Lemniscate of Bernoulli as drawn by one of John Kelsey’s gizmos.

One thought on “Day 41: Open Studio

  1. Dave and I spent the day yesterday with the residents of the ITE program that The Center for Art in Wood entertains every year. Phil and Marty also attended. The residents are in the program for 2 months and will have an exhibition at The Center in August. I’m sooo very glad that we went. It was a fantastic day spent with these incredibly talented folks. Malcolm and Gaynor are from England and like to work by hand. They do a lot of carving designs into wood in their vessels and objects. They both are picking up lots of new ideas from their fellow artisans and are broadening their horizons. I hope to borrow some of Gaynor’s gorgeous ideas. Two very talented and delightful people !! Neil is from Australia and boy can he work with wood !! He thinks outside the box and isn’t afraid to go out there. His turning is superb, but when he finishes with his dremel-like tool, (but more powerful) and his many different attachments, his work is just outstanding. He is wonderful in answering all your questions and sharing his knowledge. He gets down to a personal level with you and is “real”. Ben is from ID and is the youngster of the group, but not so “young” on talent. He has crammed a lot of knowledge into his years and is finding Neil someone to collaborate with and they learn from each other in the “lathe” room. Ben likes to turn freshly cut wood into his thin vessels and objects of art and likes to see the warping take place in his bowls which adds a uniqueness to his pieces. Did I mention that Neil’s last name is Turner and Ben’s is Carpenter? Yep. John is the photojournalist and is local, and also is an artist. He is definitely sharing his ideas with the other artists and is helping solve some problems for them. Ingenious ideas. Heather is the scholar of the group from AZ. Wonderfully knowledgeable lady to talk to and I enjoyed watching her conversations with everyone that engaged her.

    Every time we avail ourselves of something that The Center hosts, we not only have an absolutely wonderful time, but come away with more knowledge than we arrived with. It doesn’t matter that I’ll never be as successful as these artists, it’s important in growing as a person and encountering these different artists from around the world couldn’t possibly not make you a better person.

    Please don’t miss the exhibit at The Center when these wonderful people will be on hand to talk about their works of art. But next year, you really shouldn’t miss this up close and personal time observing them in their classrooms.

    Carol Leader

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